You Are Your Niche

🙋‍♀️Raise your hand if any of this sounds familiar?

❌You only show 10% of who you really are because you feel goin’ 100% could offend and turn people away.
❌You keep it broad to ensure you don’t risk alienating people and don’t miss out on opportunities.
❌You worry about haters and trolls – so you keep your opinions and beliefs to yourself.

Our society can be just brutal sometimes – and I don’t blame anyone for holding back. Women are constantly told that they have to look and act a certain way in order to be likable and beautiful. This is something that is ingrained from a young age. Up until a year and a half ago – I use to straighten my curly hair EVERY DAMN DAY! Why? Because I felt I had to fit this perception that was subconsciously being forced on me – IF I WANTED TO PRETTY – I HAD TO HAVE STRAIGHT HAIR – like all the other kids in my school. I went to school and grew up in a province (Manitoba) with little diversity. I could actually count the number of non-white people that went to my school! So, these were the people that influenced me. Now, please don’t get me wrong – some of my dearest and most treasured friends went to this school but the point I make is that there were no girls ‘like me’. I always kind of felt like an outsider – always trying to ‘keep up with the Joneses’, and I sure did put unnecessary pressure on my parents to get me the latest and greatest gizmo and clothing. Sorry, dad. This isn’t something that just leaves you when you become an adult either, it continues, but instead of wanting the latest iPhone and kicks – we get expensive cars and big houses with rooms we don’t even use.

When I moved to Ontario 9 years ago with my husband – this is really when I started to figure out who I was and what I wanted to do. Ontario is a pretty diverse place. Much more diverse than where I’d come from. The population is 14X that of Manitoba. There were people of all shapes, sizes, and colors walking the streets of downtown Toronto. Professionals of all walks of life, so much more opportunity for a woman of color who’d always worked hard but still made 30% less than her male counterparts. When I landed a job at The Globe and Mail – I felt like I’d finally made it. Not only did I get that 30% I was previously denied, but the opportunity to go as far and as high as my drive would take me. What a feeling! I held leadership roles from that point on in both sales and marketing, and had the opportunity to work on campaigns with brands such as Starbucks, Indigo, and Petro Canada. I later added graphic design to my mix to round out my portfolio and bring my end game to fruition.

Today, I find myself running my own small business leveraging my experience to help female dynamos build brilliant brands and custom lead gen systems. My goal is to help them gain the clarity and confidence that they need to leave their 9-5 and build a business from which they need no escape. I push back on everything fake, believe in authenticity, and being unapologetically yourself – always.

So, what does this all have to do with figuring out our niche, you ask?

A big part of your niche is YOU -so, figure out who you are and what you want to stand for. Then you have to go for it, all in. Get the experience, take those courses, and build that authority.

✅Stop stifling your true self to please the masses.
✅Realize that having a big following that is not engaged is useless and only serves your ego.
✅Figure out who your ideal buyers are – and speak to them and them alone.
✅Protect your unique voice – and don’t mute yourself to please people who aren’t even the right fit, to begin with.

THEN – BUILD YOUR NICHE + POSITIONING STATEMENT

✨I help [who you serve] to [what you do to help others] by [how you help others] that [ why: the impact you create]

There you have it – my thoughts on narrowing down your niche. What did you think? Do you have a niche, if so, what’s your niche statement? Comment below!

Cheers,

Kim

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